How to Do 1920s Finger Waves

Written by ava perez
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How to Do 1920s Finger Waves
Finger waves are a classic style. (Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images)

Finger waves are a hairstyle originally made popular in the 1920s by flappers and other stylish women. The hairstyle is still worn today and can be seen on starlets walking the red carpet, brides walking down the aisle or just as a special look for going out. Finger waves are silky, shiny waves placed close around the head. The look is polished, elegant and photographs well.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

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Things you need

  • Comb
  • Hair gel or waving lotion
  • Hair clips or hair clips
  • Mirror
  • Hairspray

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wash and condition your hair. Towel dry your hair but leave it damp.

  2. 2

    Apply a generous amount of gel or waving lotion to your entire head of damp hair. Comb through to distribute evenly.

  3. 3

    Decide where you'd like the waves to begin. Typically, you will want a side part with the finger wave style.

  4. 4

    Place your middle finger flat against your hair where you'd like the first wave. Insert your comb into your hair along the side of your finger.

  5. 5

    Slide the comb sideways along your finger until a ridge forms. Hold the ridge secure by placing your index finger down next to your middle finger.

  6. 6

    Slide the comb down and away from the centre of your head in a "C" shape.

  7. 7

    Insert a hair clip at the end of your "C" shape to hold the wave in place.

  8. 8

    Move over one to two finger lengths and repeat Steps 4 to 7. Continue creating finger waves until the entire frame of your face is complete.

  9. 9

    Allow your hair to air dry with the pins in place. Once dry, remove the pins and spritz with hairspray to hold the style in place.

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