How to Make Children's Victorian Hairstyles

Written by juliet myfanwy johnson
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The Victorian era covers a period in history from 1837 to 1901. Hairstyles changed several times throughout this period. As women and children's style of dress changed, from severe bodices to more free-flowing garments, hairstyles changed to match. Women used bundles of small curls in back to match the detail on the backs of their dresses. For girls, the longer-haired, sausage curl hairstyle decorated with a large bow is most popularly reflected in artwork and early photos of this time. There are two ways to approach this hairstyle---with rag curls or using a curling iron.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Brush
  • Strips of rags
  • Ribbon
  • Curling iron

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wet the hair and comb out straight. Part the hair on the side, as was the Victorian style. Leave fringe in the front untouched.

  2. 2

    Comb out 1-inch sections of hair, starting at the forehead. Take a strip of rag, about 1 inch wide, by 5 inches long, and wrap the ends of the hair around the rag. Roll the section of hair around the rag, up to the scalp. Tye a knot in the rag to secure the hair section at the scalp.

  3. 3

    Continue around the head until all hair is rolled in rag curlers.

  4. 4

    In the morning, untie the knots and pull the rags free of the hair. Curls will be tight and will resemble long sausages. Arrange the curls neatly, using your fingers. Affix a large bow into the side or the back of the hair.

  5. 5

    Use a curling iron as an alternative to rag curls. Take 1-inch sections of dry hair starting at the top of the head, and roll the curling iron to the scalp. Repeat around the head, in three rows (crown, ear level and base of head), until all hair is curled. Attach a large bow to the side or back of the head.

Tips and warnings

  • Rag curls make longer-lasting curls, because they require setting overnight as the hair dries into the curl shape.

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