Georgian Era Hairstyles

Written by emilia lamberto
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Georgian Era Hairstyles
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During the Georgian era (1714 to 1830), fashion and hairstyles started becoming quite elaborate. At first, hairstyles were simple, kept close to the head with few false curls falling down the sides. Around 1760, however, hairstyles increased in height and wigs became extremely popular. Styles became enormous and it often took hours to dress hair that would last for only a week. Both women and men were known to sport the tall, elegant hairstyles.

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High Roll

French styles were popular in the Georgian era. The high roll hairstyle was a head dress created from cow tail, horsehair or human hair and often weighed up to a pound. The hair often caused headaches and neck aches due to the strain of carrying such a weight atop of the head. Some women even went as far as sticking feathers into their hair. "Friseurs," French hairstylists, helped women to achieve these elaborate hairstyles.

Wigs

Besides the high roll, many men and women often wore tall wigs in various colours including brown, grey, white and even blue and pink. However, most individuals preferred a white colour so they would dust their wigs with flour. These wigs became quite itchy so those who wore them often used long wooden sticks to scratch their itchy scalp. In order to keep their hair in place, many often slept sitting up.

Hedgehog

The 'hedgehog' hairstyle became popular during the Georgian era in the 1780s. The hairstyle was not as tall as hairstyles in the 1770s, but still considerably tall and were wide as well. Many women often wore the hairstyle with a hat that had a wide brim. These hairstyles were also dusted with white flour in order to achieve the powdered look.

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