Victorian Wig Styles

Written by thomas mcnish
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Victorian Wig Styles
Emulate the Victorian era with a wig. (buckingham palace image by hazel proudlove from Fotolia.com)

The Victorian era is named after the British ruler, Queen Victoria, and took place during her reign from the 1830s until the end of the 19th century. During this time period distinctive, ornate fashions were prevalent in both clothing and hairstyle. Although people don't commonly wear their natural hair in a Victorian-style fashion, you can still find wigs that mimic this style of days past.

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Gibson Style

The Gibson-style Victorian wig is a classic updo with short, poofy fringe. It may also have a few longer locks of hair hanging down the sides of the head from the temple area. There are a few variations on it, including ornate curls on the top of the head and straight hair in back, or wavy hair throughout the entire thing. The shape, however, is generally the same, and can be worn by itself or with a period-accurate hat.

Chignon Style

The Victorian Chignon wig is somewhat similar to the Gibson style in the fact that it's an updo. The bun is the centrepiece, and is typically worn high up on the head. There may also be a few locks of hair hanging down the sides of the head from the temple area, and they may be tightly curled. The bun may also be simple or ornately braided, depending on the wig.

Old London Style

This Victorian-style wig features a high hairdo with ornate curls in the front. It also has stylish short fringe and long, curly locks of hair coming down the sides of the head. The back of the hair is pulled into a bun and put on the top of the head.

Marie Antoinette Style

This wig style is incredibly ornate and reflects the hairstyle donned by a decadent and beautiful queen, Marie Antoinette. It's a very high beehive-type hairdo with considerably long locks of curly hair going down the sides. There are no fringe for this wig, as the hairline is pulled straight upward. And although it comes in a few different colours, powder white is the most commonly found.

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