How to Make Beer Mug Carnation Flower Centerpieces

Written by suzie faloon
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How to Make Beer Mug Carnation Flower Centerpieces
Beer mugs work well for centrepieces. (Germany beer mug. image by Alexander Ivanov from Fotolia.com)

Carnation flower centrepieces can be made in beer mugs and a variety of containers. The mugs are acrylic or thick glass with a heavy bottom which works well for a centrepiece. The arrangements can be used for gifts for men, stag parties, club banquets, Oktoberfest and St. Patrick Day celebrations. Use white or pale yellow miniatures or full size carnations to simulate foam on cellophane ale or root beer in this simple to make novelty floral arrangement.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Floral foam
  • 18 fresh or silk carnations
  • Mug
  • Yellow, brown or green cellophane
  • Knife or wire cutters

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Line the mug with crumpled cellophane. Place floral foam inside. Add water to the foam if you're making a fresh floral arrangement.

  2. 2

    Cut 4 carnations with the knife or wire cutters at a length that is 4 1/2 inches taller than the mug. Place them in the centre of the foam. Fresh carnation stems should be cut on a slant.

  3. 3

    Cut more carnations that are 3 to 4 inches taller than the mug. Fill in the top of the mug around the 4 centre carnations from Step 2. Make sure that the stems are secured into the floral foam.

  4. 4

    Place more carnations in the mug to overhang the rim slightly. The carnations should form a mound.

  5. 5

    Check for any gaps in the flowers and add more carnations, if needed. You can lightly spray a St. Patrick's Day carnation foam bouquet with green floral spray.

Tips and warnings

  • Add a tall straw to a simulated root beer mug for a child, teenager or birthday centrepiece.

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