How much is a passport renewal?

Written by shewanda pugh
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Passport renewal fees and procedures vary according to an individual's given circumstances. An applicant may be required to apply in person or may have the option of renewing through mail. Additionally, an applicant may or may not have to pay execution fees.

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By Mail

You can renew by mail if your current passport is undamaged and can be submitted with your application, if it was issued when you were at least 16 years of age, within the last 15 years and you have not changed your name (or if you have, you can legally document it). All other applicants must visit an approved Passport Acceptance Facility.

Passport Card

The U.S. passport card is a wallet-size travel document that can be used to enter the United States from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda at land border crossings or sea ports-of-entry. It cannot be used for international air travel. It is less expensive than a passport book and can be acquired through the renewal process by current passport book holders.

Renewing

To renew by mail, you must submit Form DS-82, Application for a U.S. Passport by Mail. This form can also be found and submitted online at the U.S. Department of State website (see Resources). The additional required documents must be mailed. They include a current passport, two passport photos and additional fees. Additionally, the application can be submitted in person.

Adult Fees

Renewal fees for an Adult Passport Book and Card are £61 as of 2009. It is £48 for the Passport Book alone and £13 for the Passport Card, provided you have a current and valid passport.

Minor Fees

All minors must apply in person. The Minor Passport Book and Card is £45 as of 2009. The Minor Passport Book is £39 and the Minor Passport Card is £6. All have an additional execution fee of $25.

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