DISCOVER
×
Loading ...

How to look up a reverse fax number

Updated April 17, 2017

Communication devices have fulfilled any kind of dream that was thought to be impossible years ago. Faxes and telephones are tremendously useful. However, it is possible that sometimes, unwanted faxes arrive to our fax machine. They could be mislead faxes who were intended to someone else, or (in the worst-case scenario) threats. You don’t know who the sender is, and you are worried because those faxes seem to be an endless nuisance. Fortunately, there are easy and non-expensive ways to solve this mystery.

Loading ...

Find the return fax number. This is usually found on the cover sheet of the printed fax that you have received. However, this isn't always the case. An alternative is to use a caller ID device to see if the return fax number shows up on the phone display.

Find a reliable and reputable online phone directory with a reverse number capability. Browse until you locate a service. Some of them give you basic information for no charge. For instance, White pages (http://www.whitepages.com/) is a reputable service to find reverse fax and phone numbers, and it’s free. Some services give you basic information for no charge.

Enter the telephone number in the search form. The system will then look for a match and display the outcome.

Copy the information in a place you know it will be safe and won’t be lost.

Tip

In case you know a friend who has access to reverse fax systems, you can easily ask him to look up for the number. The people who have access to these systems usually work in telephone organisations.

Warning

It is recommended that you avoid hiring private detectives. They will charge you as much as £162 just to look up for a reverse fax number.

Loading ...

About the Author

Manuel Páucar (Lima, 1978), is the author of "Chronicles of the Exile," a popular column in the Hispanic market. In his 18 years as a writer, he's published four books and received several awards, including a special recognition from the UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization). Páucar attended the Andes Chef School in 1999, and studied theater arts at CTL Institute in 1998.

Loading ...