DISCOVER
×

Video transcription

Hey, it's Rokosz, your digital lifestyle expert, here giving you information on how to convert your old VHS movies to DVD. Now, this is a very prudent thing for you to do because now that we've seen VHS get some real age to it, we've got a real benchmark of how old they can get before they're destroyed. Yes, here, at our studios, we have taken in VHS tapes that we're finding about the 18 to 20 year mark. The actual magnetic tape inside of it will start to...the magnetic coating on the tape, rather, will actually start to flake off. There is one that comes to mind that if we hadn't actually been rolling on the DVD at the time we did the dub, that video -- a wedding video, mind you -- would never have been seen again. So if you've got some home movies, this is definitely, definitely something to seriously consider to get them onto a more stable media like DVD just as soon as you can. That's just a tip from me to you there. Now, how do we do it? Well, there are a couple of ways to go about it. First off, you can go ahead and have it sent off to a professional dub house. There...there's a lot online that you can mail off to or you'll probably find one in your community. But it's easy enough to do yourself. The thing that you want to get, down here, we have a DVD burner. Now, a lot of modern DVD players, when you go to purchase them, will have a burning function in it, meaning simply you buy blank media discs and you push play and record or just record like you've done on your VHS player for years. Well, the one we have here has both the VHS and the DVD built right in. The whole purpose of this unit is to dub either back and forth. You can record your DVDs to VHS or your VHS to DVDs. Now, a unit like this can start as inexpensive as just at or just under 100 dollars, and can go up there to the...to the 4, 800 and then into the 1,000 and much more expensive. Definitely something to consider if you're doing it. The other reason is, is you may have an older DVD player and you may not even have a VHS player anymore. It gives you fresh ones. It's all unitized in one unit, and that way, it becomes a good backup for your Blu-ray player. But getting it done, if you don't have it -- one of these unitized units -- and the dubbing pretty much, you can set it up for one-step dubbing, which is to put your blank media in here, blank media in here, and in this particular Sony unit, you just push the button on the front which direction you want to go. From here to here or from here to here. Now, if you have just a DVD player or a DVD recorder, that is an absolute must, or a VHS player, you can actually go ahead and link them together. And all you have to do there is wire it with the video out from the DVD player. Stopping. Wire the out from the VHS player into the video in in the DVD player. Stopping. All you have to do is wire the out from the VHS player to the in on the DVD recorder, push record, pause on the DVD player, play on the VCR, and then let her roll. It's like making an old mixed tape with the tapes. So there's a lot of different options, whether you send it off to have it done, whether you buy a unitized dubbing unit, whether you wire two units together, or you can actually hook your VHS player up to your computer, bring it in, edit it, and then burn it off to a disc using your disc programs. A lot of different ways to get things done. Like me, Rokosz, your digital lifestyle expert. Stream you later.