1930s Male Hairstyles

Written by tobias starr
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
1930s Male Hairstyles
Many men in the 30s refused to go out in public without a hat such as a fedora. (fedora image by Jeffrey Sinnock from Fotolia.com)

In the 1930s, men kept their hair cut short in the back, short on the sides near the ears and longer on top. It was consider disgraceful for hair to touch collars in the back, so it's was common for men to make frequent visits to the barber for a haircut, shave and shoeshine. Though this was the standard cut, many men parted their hair or combed it into different styles.

Other People Are Reading


Curls and waves were considered attractive on both men and women. Women who had straight hair would pin curls and set their hair in finger waves. While men didn't do this, those who did have naturally curly or wavy hair took advantage of it. Many of them wore their hair short like all other men at the time, but they set the curls in heavy pomade to show the wave pattern and to prevent their hair from becoming wild and frizzy. Keeping hair neat under hats was necessary.

Combed Back

Though men wore their hair shorter around the back and sides and longer on top, they would slick back their hair with oil or pomade for a very sleek look. It was uncommon for a man in the 1930s to wear his hair in public dry or devoid of hair product. Usually, men would slick their hair back with oil and put on a hat to go out.

Off-Center Part

Besides wearing hair that was combed straight back, many men who had shorter hair on the sides and back and long on top would part their hair. The parts weren't deep side parts, but usually just off-centre, with each side of hair combed to the side and down toward the ears. They used either oil or pomade to hold their hair part so that it wasn't messed up under their hats.

Don't Miss

  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.