Makeup styles from the sixties

Written by jennifer blair Google
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Makeup styles from the sixties
Bold, winged eyeliner is an important part of any 1960s make-up look. (make up image by Mat Hayward from Fotolia.com)

During the 1960s, many facets of American culture underwent a dramatic transformation. While fashion and style trends may not have the historical significance of political and social changes of the period, the new make-up styles of the period did reflect a similar change in women's roles. Women began to experiment with bolder eyeshadow looks, and the classic red lip of the 1950s was replaced by paler hues. Recreating 1960s make-up can be fun for an evening out or anytime that you want to stand out in a crowd.

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Natural Foundation and Blush

In the 1960s, most women focused their attention on accentuating their eyes and lips, so face make-up was typically kept very natural. To mimic the look today, opt for a liquid foundation that has a soft, dewy finish. Translucent powder was used heavily in the 1960s as well, and setting your foundation with a dusting of the powder is a good way to make it last throughout the day. Be sure to use a lightweight powder, though, so it does not alter the finish of the foundation. Blush in the 1960s was kept very natural looking as well, so women usually opted for matt formulas in pale pink and peach shades. Blush was usually applied just under the cheekbones and blended into the hairline, under the chin and along the neck for a contoured look. If you are aiming for a 1960s-inspired look, be sure to choose a blush that is free of shimmer and glitter. A matt bronzer in a light shade can be used to create a similar effect.

Pale or Nude Lips

Because 1960s style called for bold eyeshadow, women of the period did not typically wear bright colours on their lips. The lips still made a statement, however, because the pale shades that were worn often had an unnatural look to them. Many women used beige- or nude-coloured lipstick, though some of these lipstick shades had a white or grey cast to them. Pale pink was another common colour for lipstick in the 1960s. If you are recreating a 1960s look, opt for a warm-toned nude or pale pink lipstick. Be sure to choose a lipstick formula that has no shimmer or glitter. Lipstick in the 1960s typically had a matt or cream finish, so skip the gloss as well.

Eye-Catching Shadow

There were two main eyeshadow looks in the 1960s: striking pastels and sultry, smoky shades. Many women wore pale shades of blue, green and pink on their eyelids. Stark white was worn quite often as well. These pale colours were usually paired with a dark slash of colour in the crease, such as black or dark grey. Dark, smoky eyeshadow was another trend in the 1960s. Shades like charcoal, black or navy were often placed on the eyelid all the way up to the brow bone and underneath the lower lid for a dramatic look. Either option works if you are looking to mimic 1960s style, but be sure to take your skin tone into consideration when deciding on a look. Pale-skinned women typically look best with pastel shades, while those with a darker skin tone may prefer the smoky look.

Winged Eyeliner

One of the most distinguishing characteristics of 1960s make-up was the bold, winged eyeliner that many women wore. Black kohl eyeliner was used frequently during the period, and both the upper and lower lash lines were heavily lined for a dramatic look. Flicking the eyeliner up at the outside corner of the upper lash line gave a cat-eye effect, which is easy for modern women to replicate. It is usually easier with a gel or liquid eyeliner pen. At the outside corner of the eye where the lash line ends, flick the liner upward just a bit. From the tip of the flicked line, draw another line back to the lash line. There should be a small triangle where the skin is still visible. Fill this area in with the liner for a perfect winged look.

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