Types of Newspaper Ads

Written by rick suttle Google
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Types of Newspaper Ads
Newspapers are a common method of advertising. (man reading newspaper image by jimcox40 from Fotolia.com)

The local daily newspaper can be an effective medium for placing ads. Corporations or mail order companies often advertise in multiple newspapers across the country and national newspapers such as USA Today or The Wall Street Journal. Most newspapers allow you to place a variety of ads in them, including classified ads or larger display ads. The type of newspaper ad a person or company uses largely depends on their overall objective.

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Classified Ads

Newspaper classified ads are probably the most cost-effective of all newspaper ads. Businesses are usually charged a higher rate than consumers, who typically market their wares or used items in newspapers. Newspapers charge a certain rate per line for classified ads. A standard classified ad may consist of three or four lines of copy at a standard rate. The rate increases with additional lines. Classified ads tend to be more effective if they are run consistently for a certain period of time. Repetitive classified advertising can increase a company's credibility as the consumer will often equate consistency with stability.

Business Card Ad

A business-card ad is a small rectangular newspaper ad that usually has a relatively thick outside border. The ad is about the size of a typical business card or slightly larger. Business card ads usually contain the name of a company, a little about the company's offer and products and a blurb that may differentiate a company from competitors: "Serving the great Cincinnati area since 1969." These ads may be placed near the classified section or in whatever space the newspaper publisher designates for them. They are frequently grouped together.

Coupon Ad

A coupon ad can be highly effective because the consumer can save money on a company's product or service. They are geared toward services or products that people use frequently. Coupon ads can be any size, but publishers usually keep the size fairly uniform throughout the newspaper.


Circulars are the glossy inserts that come tucked inside a newspaper. They are frequently printed by a third party and shipped to a newspaper's printing centre, where they are inserted into the paper. Because of their expense, circulars are most commonly used by national chains who can advertise in a variety of markets.

Display Ads

Newspapers usually offer either quarter-page, half-page or full-page display ads. Small display ads may be available, but the size of display ads stays consistent because newspapers usually advertise their rates in their media packets. Display ads are used to build awareness of a particular product or service. They may also inform people where to call or write for more information. Sometimes, full page ads contain order forms, which is considered a direct-response ad.


Spadeas are another type of newspaper ad. A spadea is a separately printed yet shorter sheet of paper that wraps around the left spine of a newspaper. Spadeas are also folded in half with the newspaper and can be easily removed for viewing. Companies can print on one or both sides of a spadea. The primary benefit of a spadea is that it gets the reader's attention because it covers part of the front page. This little annoyance is what helps draw attention to the spadea.

Legal Advertising

Legal advertising generally appears in or near the classified ads. Legal ads contain information that is required by law to be made available to the public. The information is usually of a specific and professional nature. Notices to creditors, name changes and information about public hearings are typical of this type of advertising. Any individual placing legal advertising will generally do so with the advice of an attorney.

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