Solar system costume ideas

Written by heather jean stoskopf
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Solar system costume ideas
The solar system can form the basis of a unique fancy dress costume. (Jupiterimages/ Images)

Uniquely creative costumes can attract a great deal of attention at costume parties, Halloween events, parades and even school functions. With some imagination and creativity, costumes can be created from unique concepts, like the solar system. A solar system costume can also be a fun and exciting way to teach young students about the planets while keeping their attention. This article will describe some different types of solar system costumes that can be created.

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Understanding the solar system

To create a costume of the solar system, it is important to know a little information on the subject. The solar system includes the sun, and eight planets (Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet). The nine planets in order of their distance from the sun are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. When creating the planets for a solar system costume, authenticity comes from using appropriate colours. Paint Mercury grey, Venus yellow, Earth blue, green, brown and white, Mars brown-yellow, Jupiter light blue and orange striped, Saturn yellow with grey rings, Uranus light blue, Neptune dark blue and Pluto a cloudy grey. Also, choose spheres that represent the various sizes of the planets, which are, from smallest to largest, Pluto, Mercury, Mars, Venus, Earth, Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter and the Sun. Earth's moon, if you choose to include it, is about twice the size of Pluto.

Hula-hoop solar system costume

One creative idea for making a solar system costume is using a hula-hoop to serve as the solar system frame. Start by decorating a sweat suit to appear as a galaxy. Cut out small white stars from felt and glue them on with fabric glue. Once the stars have dried, outline them with silver glitter or glow-in-the-dark puffy paint for added detail. Next, create the frame for the solar system, using a hula-hoop that is big enough to fit around the costume wearer, but not overly large. Spray-paint the hula-hoop black and let it dry. Instruct the costume wearer to hold the hula-hoop around his middle, a little above the waist. With the hula-hoop in place, tie a string of clear fishing line to the front left side. Knot the end of the fishing line to a safety pin and attach the pin to the left shoulder of the sweatshirt. Cut three more lengths of fishing line and attach the strings to the front right, back left and back right sides of the shirt. When all four lines are attached, the strings should be taut and the hula-hoop should be level all around the body. Finally, create the planets, sun and moon by painting styrofoam balls the appropriate colours and string the planets from the hula-hoop with fishing line.

Simple solar system hat

Using a black baseball cap, paint white stars with puffy paint. Let it dry. Next, cut circles out of white craft foam to represent the planets, sun and moon. Make the circles different sizes to represent the size of each planet. Use markers or paint to add colour to the craft-foam planets. Once the planets are dry, glue each planet around the cap in their order in relation to the sun. This is a simple costume that can be thrown on in a flash, but helps visualise the solar system.

Sunny head

A third costume idea is a variation on the first costume, without the hula-hoop. Use the same star-covered black sweat suit as the base. Next, string up the painted styrofoam balls that represent each planet. While the costume wearer is standing still, pin each planet to the chest of the sweatshirt. Create a hat to represent the sun. This can be as easy as taking a yellow baseball cap and painting orange sunbeams on it. This costume is unique and creative and not as bulky as the hula-hoop version.

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