How to Insert Eyelets

Written by laura hageman
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Eyelets are metal-type rings or squares that strengthen the holes in paper or fabric, or draw attention to your work or design. Paper sometimes tears after a period of time and makes the paper look bad. By inserting eyelets, it will help preserve the paper to last that much longer. Eyelets also enhance the appearance of the paper or material and spark an interest by others to look at it or read it. Eyelets come in different shapes and sizes, but circles are the most commonly used eyelets.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Hole Punch
  • Hammer
  • Eyelet setter
  • Construction paper or cardboard

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Lay the paper or material on a flat surface. Decide where you want the eyelets and make markings, if needed, with a pencil.

  2. 2

    Place hole punch on top of the area where you want to insert an eyelet. Hit the top of the hole punch with the hammer. This will make a hole in the material. If you are using paper you can simply make the holes with the hole puncher alone.

  3. 3

    Put the eyelet onto the hole. Place a piece of cardboard or construction paper over where the eyelet was laid and turn the paper or material over. The idea of the cardboard or construction paper is to keep the eyelet in its place until you make it permanent.

  4. 4

    Use the eyelet setter to keep the eyelet in place. Tap the top of the eyelet setter with a hammer lightly. You will see the ends of the eyelet flatten, which will hold the eyelet in place.

  5. 5

    Flip the paper or material back over to the other side. Continue on to the next eyelet. Repeat the steps for the remaining eyelets. Finish one eyelet at a time in order to do them correctly and make them look good.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not use too many eyelets or it will take away from the appearance of the paper or material.

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