Coconut milk nutrition information

Written by sarah dewitt ince
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Coconut milk is a very nutrient-dense food containing calcium, Omega 3 fats, fibre and protein. It is a sweet and luxurious treat that you can add to smoothies, or just take alone as a nutritional supplement. Try cooking with coconut milk, because the chemical composition of the oils in the milk don’t change; it doesn't lose its nutritional benefits like some oils.

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Calories

One tbsp of coconut milk contains about 120 calories, so consume it in small amounts. About a tablespoon of coconut milk per day is all you need to enjoy the health benefits from the Omega 3 fats. These healthy fats are needed by the body to maintain good health.

Fat

Coconut milk is a good source of fat for the body. Coconut oil contains several different types of fat, such as saturated fat, polyunsaturated fat, Omega 3 fats, Omega 6 fats and monounsaturated fat. Your body actually needs a certain amount of healthy fat for your heart, brain and health. Omega 3 fatty acids also reduce inflammation, as well as lubricate your cells and joints.

Sugars

Coconut milk is very sweet, yet it contains a small amount of sugars such as glucose and fructose. The body does need a small amount of sugar to use as energy. Coconut milk is very dense, so even though it is rich, it only contains about 1 to 2 per cent sugar. This is why the milk has a thick, sweet taste.

Calcium

Coconut milk also contains a good amount of calcium. One cup of coconut milk contains about 200 IU of calcium. Your body needs calcium for healthy teeth and bones, as well as your immune system. Coconut milk also contains trace minerals such as sodium, potassium, iron, phosphorus and copper.

Protein

Coconut milk contains very small levels of protein. The type of protein found in coconut milk are alanine, cystine, arginine and serene. These are easily digestible, simple proteins. Your body uses protein to maintain and build new cells. Your hair, nails and skin are made up mostly of protein.

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