Pork shoulder roast cooking times

Written by sam eggleston | 13/05/2017
Pork shoulder roast cooking times
You should season your pork shoulder well before roasting. (Getty Images)

Pork shoulder roasts are relatively inexpensive to purchase because of their fatty content, but they are versatile and tasty. You can simply put a spice rub on this roast or you can cook it with vegetables and potatoes. No matter how you decide to cook your roast, you just have to remember to cook it for a proper amount of time to make the meat safe for consumption.

Pork and food-borne illnesses

It is no myth that undercooked pork carries food-borne illnesses. If a piece of pork is undercooked, and infected with the trichina worm, then, according to the Free Library, a diner could develop trichinosis. Always make sure to cook pork to 71 degrees Celsius (160 Fahrenheit), which is the lowest temperature generally considered safe.

Preparing the shoulder roast

For a moist and well-cooked pork shoulder roast, score the top of the roast with a sharp knife and make 1 cm (half-inch) deep cuts from one end to the other. Rub the pork with spices and then place in a roasting pan with the fat side up. Don't bother putting any water in the dish because, frankly, it doesn't make any difference when you're roasting.

Cooking the shoulder roast

Heat your oven to 160 degrees Celsius (325 Fahrenheit) and insert the roast and pan. You'll need to cook pork roast for 1 hour 20 minutes per kg (approximately 35 minutes per pound). That means a 1.5 kg roast should take two hours to cook (or a three pound roast should take about an hour and 45 minutes to cook).

The obvious way to tell how well meat is cooked is to get an instant-read or meat thermometer. This will allow you to check the meat and make sure it is cooked as well as it should be.

Always remove the roast from the oven and let it sit for about 15 minutes to completely saturate the meat with the pork's natural juices.

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