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How to cook a buffalo roast

Updated February 21, 2017

Buffalo meat has less fat and fewer calories than beef, pork or even skinless chicken. A buffalo roast resembles a beef roast, but it doesn't have the streaks of marbleised fat. The buffalo roasting process is also similar. But because it lacks the insulating fat, it must be cooked at a lower temperature for the same amount of time. When it comes to a safe internal temperature, treat a buffalo roast the same way you would a beef roast.

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  1. Rub the salt, pepper and garlic powder into the buffalo roast. Alternatively, you can soak the roast in your favourite marinade overnight.

  2. Heat 18 ml (1 tbsp) of vegetable oil in a frying pan, swirling the pan to coat it evenly. Place the roast in the pan and brown it on all sides.

  3. Transfer the roast to a roasting pan. Add a sliced onion, parsley and 180 ml (3/4 cup) water or broth. Cover the pan.

  4. Place the roast in an oven that is warmed to 135 degrees. Cook the roast for 1 hour and 20 minutes, then take a an internal temperature reading with a meat thermometer. A safe internal temperature for a roast is 63 degrees, which is considered medium. Allow the roast to cook, checking every 10 to 15 minutes, until the roast reaches temperature.

  5. Let the roast sit for about 10 minutes after you remove it from the oven before slicing.

  6. Tip

    If you want to roast vegetables such as potatoes and carrots along with the buffalo roast, boil them for five minutes before adding them to the roasting pan.

    Warning

    Use the temperature of the buffalo roast, not how long it was in the oven, to determine whether it is done. Underdone meat can cause food-bourn illness; overdone meat will be tough and less flavourful.

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Things You'll Need

  • 1.36 kg (3 pounds) buffalo roast
  • 6 mm (1 tsp) salt
  • 1.5 mm (1/4 tsp) pepper
  • 1.5 mm (1/4 tsp) garlic powder
  • 18 mm (1 tbsp) vegetable oil
  • Frying pan
  • Roasting pan
  • 1 onion
  • 1 sprig fresh parsley
  • 180 ml (3/4 cup) water or broth

About the Author

Delaware-based Daisy Cuinn has been writing professionally since 1997, when she became the features editor for her local biweekly music newspaper. She has been a staff writer and contributor to online and offline magazines, including "What It Is!," Celebrations.com and Slashfood. Cuinn holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Temple University.

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