Swedish breakfast foods

Written by daisy cuinn
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Swedish breakfast foods
Breakfast in Sweden is simple. (Sweden image by Fata-Morgana from Fotolia.com)

The Swedish breakfast table includes simple dishes that are quick and easy to put together, unless it's a holiday when the breakfast feast includes treats like sweet homemade yeast breads. Day-to-day, sweet foods are less common for breakfast in Sweden, while things like cheese and crispy breads are frequently served.

Other People Are Reading

Smörgas

A typical Swedish breakfast includes an open-faced sandwich called smörgas. In its simplest form, it is a slice---or two---of bread topped with butter and sliced hard cheese. Other toppings might include cold cuts, salmon, sausage, lettuce, tomato, a sliced pear, or jam. It is usually eaten with a fork and knife.

Swedish breakfast foods
Bread, cheese and other toppings make smörgas. (Ham lettuce tomato and cheese open sandwich on wholemeal bread. image by Brett Mulcahy from Fotolia.com)

Muesli

Muesli is a blend of whole grains, flakes, and an array of dried fruits. There are many variations from simple apple and raisin varieties to tropical blends that include dried papaya, pineapple and coconut. For breakfast, Muesli is usually eaten with milk or Filmjölk, a soured milk similar to American cultured buttermilk.

Swedish breakfast foods
Muesli is a common Swedish breakfast. (Bowl with muesli. image by Saskia Massink from Fotolia.com)

Kalles and Knäckebröd

Kalles is a popular brand name for a Swedish creamed caviar that has a texture similar to mayonnaise and commonly comes in a tube. It is often eaten in the morning with knäckebröd, or crisp bread.

Swedish breakfast foods
Swedish crisp bread, or knäckebröd, is often served with creamed caviar. (red tomato with crispbreads, spring onions and gre image by DianaStrizhigotskaya from Fotolia.com)

Kaffe

Kaffe---coffee---is extremely popular in Sweden and is commonly consumed in the morning with breakfast, as well as in the midafternoon. The old-fashioned method of brewing coffee with egg is a tradition especially popular in Swedish American communities, though most coffee in Sweden is brewed without the egg, with a drip or percolator method. Swedish coffee is usually brewed strong.

Swedish breakfast foods
Coffee is a common breakfast beverage in Sweden. (sweeten coffee image by Radu Razvan from Fotolia.com)

Lussebullar

Lussebullar, or Saint Lucia Buns, are sweet saffron yeast rolls traditionally served at Christmas time, primarily around the Swedish celebration of Lucia Day on December 13. Also called lussekatter (Lucia cats), these rolls are a central part of the Lucia Day breakfast.

Pannkaker and Våfflor

Pannkaker (pancakes) and Våfflor (waffles) are very popular---in fact, every year on March 25, Swedes celebrate Våffeldagen, or Waffle Day, by making and eating crisp waffles with whipped cream and jam. Popular though they are in Sweden, waffles and pancakes are not commonly thought of as breakfast foods, as they are in the United States.

While waffles are more of a dessert in Sweden, pancakes are served for supper, often with pea soup. The Swedish pancake breakfast is a Swedish-American invention.

Swedish breakfast foods
Crisp waffles have their own day in Sweden. (waffle hearts image by Inger Anne Hulbækdal from Fotolia.com)

Don't Miss

Resources

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.