How to Write a Church Invitation

Written by elizabeth (lisa)thompson
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How to Write a Church Invitation
Written invitations from churches should be brief but heartfelt. (church spire and tower on old church image by thomas owen from

Churches need invitations for a variety of occasions. The church may invite community members to visit; visitors to join a new believers' or membership class; members to join a ministry, such as ushering; or pastors to speak at a special event. The church wants to make a good impression on the recipient so he will respond favourably. Whatever the event, you can write an effective church invitation by following a few basic steps.

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  1. 1

    Narrow the focus of the invitation to the event or reason for the invitation. Keep it brief but heartfelt and personal. Heartfelt phrases include those such as "We hope to see you there," "You have been missed" or "Please let me know how I can help." These phrases help draw the reader in to the reason for the letter.

  2. 2

    Include three paragraphs. The first paragraph greets the reader. The second paragraph, also the longest, invites the reader and elaborates on the purpose of the event. The last paragraph blesses the reader.

  3. 3

    Adapt this format to any event. A sample letter follows:


    Dear Friend,

    Greetings from First Church! We hope this letter finds you well.

    The church is hosting an all-church picnic on March 5, 2011, to enjoy a time of fellowship after the service. We extend a personal invitation to you, and would love to see you there. Our pastor feels the event will draw both old and new visitors and members alike.

    We look forward to seeing you there. God bless you!

    In Him,

  4. 4

    Use preprinted invitations as another alternative, with just the most basic information of who, what, when and where. While these invitations provide limited information, they are easy to complete. Their disadvantages include a very informal and impersonal feel, and lack of space to add as much information as the church might want.

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