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How to send a picture to a phone

Updated February 21, 2017

The standard method of sending a picture text message is to take a photograph with a cell phone and then press the "Send" button on the cell phone's menu screen. Input a phone number of a cell phone that can receive picture messages, then send the message just like a standard text message. There are also alternate ways of sending a picture message if your phone can't take or send images by using free services provided on the Internet.

Visit a site such as PixDrop, Pix2Phone or SMS Everywhere.

Select the company or carrier that the recipient's phone uses for service, such as Verizon, AT&T or Sprint.

Enter your valid e-mail address. If the person receiving the picture message sends a reply message, that message will be sent to this e-mail address, not your phone.

Enter the mobile phone number for your picture's destination.

Upload the picture to the sending website in the box "Upload Picture" by clicking "Browse" and selecting the picture you want sent.

Click the "Send" button and wait for the picture to send.

Tip

It is possible to send a photo to a cell phone just by sending a regular e-mail message, but each cell phone carrier has its own specific e-mail address that must be used. Enter the recipient's 10-digit cell phone number followed by the correct @domain for the recipient's cell phone provider and the photo will be delivered. Note that standard messaging fees apply, so check with the recipient to make sure he won't be charged an exorbitant fee. Here are a few carriers and the address that must be used to send photos from e-mail to cell phone: T-Mobile: phonenumber@tmomail.net Virgin Mobile: phonenumber@vmobl.com Cingular: phonenumber@cingularme.com Sprint: phonenumber@messaging.sprintpcs.com Verizon: phonenumber@vtext.com Nextel: phonenumber@messaging.nextel.com

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About the Author

Chris Brake has been a freelance writer since 1999. He has attained numerous graduate and undergraduate study courses involving language and the written word as a vehicle of expression. He co-wrote the feature film, "Imaginary You."