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How to melt chocolate for molds

Chocolate is a guilty pleasure that both adults and children enjoy. Share another experience with your children by creating your own chocolate-moulded candies, lollipops and treats. Filling these moulds requires that the chocolate being used, whether it is semi-sweet or milk, be melted. Chocolate melts at anywhere from 36.6 to 37.7 degrees C, which can be accomplished using readily available appliances and utensils.

Place 0.454kg. of chocolate into a microwave-safe bowl.

Place the bowl into the microwave and turn the microwave to 50 per cent power.

Microwave the chocolate for 1 minute. Stir the chocolate and microwave it again at 50 per cent for 1 more minute.

Stir the chocolate and continue to microwave it until it is completely melted.

Spoon the chocolate into the moulds and tap the filled moulds gently on the table. This will help remove any air bubbles from the mould.

Store any unused chocolate in an airtight container in a dry, cool place. Do not store the chocolate in the refrigerator.

Place 0.454kg. of chocolate into a small pot (or the top of a double-boiler pot).

Set the smaller pot into a larger pot (or the bottom of a double-boiler pot) that has been filled 1/3 full with water.

Place both pots onto a stove burner. Turn the burner on low heat and continuously stir the chocolate until it is completely melted, which may take 15 minutes or longer. Do not allow the chocolate to boil.

Spoon the chocolate into the moulds, following Steps 5 and 6 from above.

Things You'll Need

  • Chocolate
  • Microwave-safe bowl
  • Microwave
  • Pots, 1 small, 1 large (optional)
  • Double-boiler pot (optional)
  • Mold
  • Air tight container
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About the Author

Residing in Chippewa Falls, Wis., Jaimie Zinski has been writing since 2009. Specializing in pop culture, film and television, her work appears on Star Reviews and various other websites. Zinski is pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in history at the University of Wisconsin.