How to make a mediaeval pennant

Written by keith dooley
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How to make a mediaeval pennant
Pennants are sometimes used as a form of bunting. (ppl58/iStock/Getty Images)

A pennant is a flag that's long in length and typically tapers to a point. Pennants may be constructed of heavy cotton or nylon and are used for identification, national pride and team spirit. During mediaeval times, pennants were a means of displaying colours and symbols associated with royalty or various armies. Making mediaeval pennants for a project or decoration is fun and relatively easy and requires only a few supplies.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Heavy cotton or nylon material
  • Ruler
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Iron-on transfers and/or cloth cutouts
  • Permanent markers
  • Iron
  • Needle and thread
  • Fabric glue

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Select a shape for the pennant. Choose a traditional triangle shape or consider using other mediaeval-based shapes, such as those with scalloped or jagged edges.

  2. 2

    Draw the outline for the pennant on a piece of cotton or nylon cloth using a ruler and pen. Create interesting designs such as scalloped edges by tracing around a lid or other round object. Cut out the pennant with scissors following the pen outline.

  3. 3

    Determine a design for the pennant. Consider mediaeval symbols, lettering and other items from the period. Arrange iron-on and cloth cutouts on the pennant and determine areas that may be used for drawing with permanent markers.

  4. 4

    Attach iron-on items to the pennant using a warm iron. Cloth cutouts may be sewn on using a needle and thread or attached with fabric glue.

  5. 5

    Draw mediaeval designs, pictures or letters on the pennant using permanent markers. Use various coloured markers and allow the ink to thoroughly dry before handling the pennant.

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