How long does priority mail take?

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How long does priority mail take?
The time frames for Priority Mail are not guaranteed. (mail image by Marvin Gerste from Fotolia.com)

The U.S. Post Office advertises a one- to three-day delivery time frame for its domestic Priority Mail service and six to ten days for its Priority Mail International service. However, those time frames are not guaranteed. Most of the time, Priority Mail is delivered within two days domestically and eight days internationally, but there are exceptions. If there is a weather event or any other circumstance that causes a delay, mail sent Priority might not be delivered for up to four days beyond the advertised time frames.

The main reason a business or individual would pay more for Priority Mail is a more defined delivery time. There is no set time frame for First-Class Mail delivery, while with Priority Mail, you can expect delivery to take as many days as advertised. In addition, First-Class Mail handles only letters, large envelopes and packages that weigh 369gr. or less.

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Priority Mail Delivery Time Frame

The U.S. Post Office advertises a one- to three-day delivery time frame for its domestic Priority Mail service and six to ten days for its Priority Mail International service. However, those time frames are not guaranteed. Most of the time, Priority Mail is delivered within two days domestically and eight days internationally, but there are exceptions. If there is a weather event or any other circumstance that causes a delay, mail sent Priority might not be delivered for up to four days beyond the advertised time frames.

The main reason a business or individual would pay more for Priority Mail is a more defined delivery time. There is no set time frame for First-Class Mail delivery, while with Priority Mail, you can expect delivery to take as many days as advertised. In addition, First-Class Mail handles only letters, large envelopes and packages that weigh 369gr. or less.

How Priority Mail Delivery Works

When you designate a letter or package for Priority Mail, the delivery time begins based on the date postmarked on the item. Depending on its destination, the parcel is often sent on its way using the same transportation network as the U.S. Post Office's Express Mail service. This enables Priority Mail to reach its destination faster than First-Class mail.

Although Priority Mail costs more than First Class, the price by weight is considerably less than other parcel and package delivery carriers. Furthermore, Priority Mail is delivered on Saturdays at no additional cost, while other major carriers do not offer Saturday delivery or charge extra for it. In addition, businesses that send out a large number of packages can order free mailing supplies, including Priority Mail envelopes and boxes. A good selection of commonly used sized boxes and envelopes are available for free. Priority Mail mailing address labels also can be ordered free of charge.

Furthermore, businesses can save additional money by using Priority Mail Flat Rate. With this flat rate, whatever fits in the flat-rate envelope or box is sent at a predefined price, regardless of its weight.

Priority Mail Online Savings

With Priority Mail online service, businesses can realise additional savings and save time and personnel in trips to the post office. The Click-N-Ship program features commercial-based shipping prices and also accommodates permits or metering postage. Additional savings are available for businesses that ship large volumes of mail or packages.

Through Click-N-Ship, the mailing label and postage can be done online and printed. Pickup also can be scheduled online. In addition, a U.S. Post Office Business Customer Support team is available to assist with bringing postal management to your workplace.

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