Where to buy glass block windows

Written by ingrid hansen
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Where to buy glass block windows
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Glass block windows have the unique ability to provide both natural light and insulation to a living space. They're often used for basement windows, but they can make any living space more beautiful. Glass block windows are practical alternative to standard windows, and they're often used in place of solid walls; they're even used for ceilings and floors.

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History

Single glass blocks were first used to provide light in cellars and to the bowels of ships. These first glass blocks were square sections of conventional glass. Around 1880, glass blocks were constructed in the shape of bottles. They were mouth blown and had a slight opening. Even though these blocks were set in mortar, condensation always worked its way in. Machine-made glass blocks were the next stage of development, which were an improvement in size consistency. In the 1930s, improved machines created even better products. The Corning-Steuben and Owens-Illinois blocks were among them. These blocks were constructed by two halves of glass block pressed together at high temperatures, leaving a hollow centre and complete seal. The same basic principle of construction is used in making glass blocks today.

Glass or Acrylic

Some of the best features of glass block windows are their thermal insulation, security (over standard windows), excellent light allowance, and decorative beauty.

Acrylic block has been introduced as a less expensive alternative to glass block. When making your choice, consider that glass block is much harder than acrylic block, and cleaning will leave no scratches on glass. Routine cleaning of acrylic will leave scratches over time. Acrylic block also is easily scratched by workers during installation. Acrylic block windows eventually acquire a faded and cloudy appearance.

Stores that Sell Glass Block Windows

Glass block windows are sold at Home Depot, Lowe's and hardware stores. Any building or home improvement store will carry glass blocks. Not all home improvement stores will have unique shapes commonly required by interior projects, such as curved sections, but most will gladly order them for you at no extra charge.

Shopping for Glass Block Windows Online

If you're located far from brick and mortar home improvement retailers, many online outlets sell glass block windows. Many of them offer free quotes over the phone, a real time saver.

Pacific Accent offers a wide choice of patterns in glass blocks and frame option on their Website that is located in our Resources section.

Block Window Systems offers a series of affordable glass block windows, which can be ordered online. This company offers both acrylic and glass block windows and has free shipping on all orders.

Pittsburgh Corning's Website provides a list of retailers that stock their brand of glass block windows. Follow the links in our Resources section. Enter your zip code for the ones nearest you.

Coloured Glass Block

Columbus Glass Block has a large collection of coloured glass blocks and design options to choose from. You can add a splash of colour to a standard glass block window, or create a design of your own.

Blocks with designs are not painted on, but are fused to the glass so they will not chip or crack. You can purchase or create large murals or paintings spread out over a large grouping of glass blocks, or you can purchase a design for one single block.

Warning

None of the products or retailers listed here are recommendations. Please take care when making your purchase.

If you're building a glass wall for your shower, you may be able to do the project yourself. If you're installing a large glass block window into an exterior part of your home, you should consult with a builder.

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