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Remedy for fissures in tongue

Updated July 20, 2017

Tongue fissures are also known as "scrotal tongue" or "lingua plicata." It is a benign condition that usually has no adverse effects. Tongue fissures tend to look like one or more shallow to deep grooves appearing on the upside of the tongue. However, despite appearances, it isn't usually a painful condition. The exact cause of tongue fissures is still unknown, but it usually occurs in conjunction with certain other syndromes, and is also often hereditary.

Treatments

Since tongue fissures are a benign condition, they don't really require any specific treatment. However, though usually not painful, some individuals with tongue fissures may experience some pain or discomfort if food or other debris gets stuck in the fissures. Be sure to brush your tongue after every meal to ensure that all food and debris are removed from the fissure. In an extreme case, the groove could become infected, which will hurt much more than the initial inconvenience of tongue brushing.
In addition to this, highly acidic food can irritate a tongue fissure, so steer clear of foods like tomatoes and citrus fruits. The general rule is that if eating a certain type of food causes you pain by irritating your tongue fissure, stop eating it.

Healing

See your general practitioner and get a medical prescription for a probiotic that can help close up the fissures in your tongue. Probiotics such as acidophilus should be bought in capsule form to be effective. However, instead of just ingesting the probiotic, break open the capsule onto your tongue fissure and keep the capsule's contents there for 10 to 15 seconds before swallowing. Repeat this daily until the area has healed.
This sometimes works because tongue fissures and related conditions, like geographic tongue, are sometimes caused by too much unhealthy bacteria in your digestive tract. Probiotics encourage good bacteria, and can therefore help. Also consider skin grafting or suturing to cover up the grooves on your tongue. However, this isn't a recommended remedy as the upper surface of your tongue is what gives you your sense of taste. By grafting another piece of skin on top of it, it will seriously impede your ability to enjoy food. This should be a remedy of last resort.

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