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Diet for blood type A positive

Updated February 21, 2017

More than 80 per cent of Americans have Type O or Type A blood. Those with Type A blood are said to have sensitive immune systems and are thought to be predisposed to a number of illnesses, including cancer and diabetes. According to the blood type diet, eating the right kind of food means primarily eating foods with lectins (proteinlike compounds in food) that are compatible with Type A blood. Critics say that these restrictive diets may not meet a person's standard nutritional needs.

Type A Foods

If you wish to follow a diet recommended for those with Type A blood, you must become a vegetarian. Eat only fresh, organic vegetables prepared steamed or raw. Protein is consumed through lentils, soybeans (and soy products such as soy milk and tofu), pinto beans and black beans. Dieters should also eat whole grains, berries and plums. The occasional treat of poultry is said to be well tolerated by Type A eaters when a strictly vegetarian diet becomes overwhelming.

Type A Restrictions

Foods with gluten should be limited and replaced with spelt products (breads and pastas), which contain water-soluble gluten that is much easier for your body to digest. Avoid eating whole-fat dairy products, as well as peppers and tomatoes. Stay away from tropical and citrus fruits.

Type A Meal Examples

Those with Type A blood may eat oatmeal with soy milk and real maple syrup for breakfast. Drink water. For lunch, consider a Greek salad (lettuce, celery, cucumber, green onions, feta cheese, lemon and mint), one apple, a slice of spelt bread and a cup of herbal tea. Dinner could be a tofu-pesto lasagne, steamed broccoli, more herbal tea and frozen yoghurt for dessert.

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About the Author

Gail began writing professionally in 2004. Now a full-time proofreader, she has written marketing material for an IT consulting company, edited auditing standards for CPAs and ghostwritten the first draft of a nonfiction Amazon bestseller. Gail holds a Master of Arts in English literature and has taught college-level business communication, composition and American literature.