The best diet breakfast cereals

Written by brian burhoe Google
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The best diet breakfast cereals
Oatmeal with brown sugar and blueberries (oatmeal with brown sugar and blueberries image by David Smith from Fotolia.com)

The best diet breakfast cereals are high in fibre, protein, vitamins and minerals while low in fat and sugar. The United Kingdom Food Standards Agency recommends that the consumer should look for whole grains. If purchasing packaged cereal, read the ingredients list carefully. Cereal manufacturers have been reducing the levels of sugar, food additives and even salt in some of their products. But the onus is on the consumer to read the labels.

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Oatmeal

Oatmeal has been described as the ultimate whole grain breakfast. As well as having the recommended six grams of dietary fibre per serving, it is low in saturated fats, cholesterol and salt. By cooking it from scratch, you control the levels of sugar and salt per serving.

Barley Cereal

Hulled barley is readily available. So are rolled barley flakes. One third of a cup of barley per cup of water provides a rich product. Honey can be added to taste.

Brown Rice Cereal

Oven-roasted organic brown rice can be purchased ready to cook. It can be easily prepared on the hob or in a microwave oven. An average serving contains 190 calories, with no cholesterol or saturated fat.

Rolled Wheat Flakes

Available at natural food stores and some supermarkets, these grains of wheat are dry roasted without the use of fats and oils. An average serving of cooked rolled wheat flakes contains 160 calories, 40 grams of carbohydrates, three grams of dietary fibre and three grams of protein.

Puffed or Shredded Wheat

Although containing some trans fats, sugar and sodium, commercial puffed wheat and shredded wheat is among the healthiest of popular brand cereals. Remember to read the nutrition labels before purchasing.

Bran Flakes

Commercial bran flakes, all bran and multi-bran flakes are high in dietary fibre, minerals, and vitamins. A typical serving contains 1.5 grams of fats and 75 mg. of sodium, which may be too high for some diets.

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