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Can You Freeze Ganache?

Updated February 21, 2017

A combination of semi-sweet chocolate and double cream, ganache is a versatile icing and filing for cakes, cookies, brownies and other desserts. You can even add flavourings and liqueur to the mixture, if desired, as well as freeze the mixture for use later. You can also use ganache with other icings as well as use the mixture as a substitute for whipped cream.

Freezing

You can freeze ganache for up to nine months in your freezer before the mixture starts to lose its flavour. Store the mixture in an airtight container or freezer bag and place it in the coldest area of your freezer --- in the bottom or back of the freezer. This keeps the ganache from accidentally thawing if the freezer door is left ajar.

Thawing

To thaw frozen ganache, remove it from the freezer and place the container or bag in a large pot full of water or a double boiler. Heat the pot or double boiler over low heat on your stove to slowly thaw the mixture. Once the ganache is thawed, remove it from its container or bag and place the mixture in a clean bowl or other container.

Microwaving

If your microwave contains a "Defrost" or "Thaw" function, you can also thaw the ganache using that appliance. Place the container or bag in the microwave, set the defrost control for 10 to 15 minutes, then check to see if the mixture is liquid yet. If the ganache is still frozen, place the mixture back in the microwave and set the control for an additional 10 to 15 minutes. Remove the ganache as soon as it no longer frozen.

Tips

You can also thaw the ganache by placing it in a pot of hot water and sitting the pot on a counter top or table to thaw without the use of a stove.

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About the Author

Nick Davis is a freelance writer specializing in technical, travel and entertainment articles. He holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Memphis and an associate degree in computer information systems from the State Technical Institute at Memphis. His work has appeared in "Elite Memphis" and "The Daily Helmsman" in Memphis, Tenn. He is currently living in Albuquerque, N.M.