Fashion Boots in the '70s

Written by cee donohue
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Fashion Boots in the '70s
Go-Go boots were named after go-go dancers. (Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images)

Whether you like the fashion of the 1970s or not, it definitely made a statement. The styles of the era included bell-bottomed trousers, leisure suits, hot trousers and peasant blouses. As for boots of the 1970s, some of those styles are still being worn today.

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Go-Go Boots

Go-go boots got their name from the go-go dancers that used to wear them on disco television shows. These boots were flat or heeled and almost reached the knee. Typically, there was a zipper on the inside of the boot that zipped from the instep to the top of the boot. Go-go boots were usually worn with miniskirts and short dresses. The leather or vinyl boots came in a variety of colours.

Ankle Boots

Both men and women wore ankle boots. Men wore leather ankle boots with business suits, slacks and jeans. Men's ankle boots were most often seen in black, brown and white. Women's ankle boots usually had a heel and were available in many colours and patterns. Ankle boots of the '70s were also made in the platform style and favoured by pop and rock stars.

Platform Boots

Platform boots were very popular with teenagers and young adults. These knee-high boots had a very thick sole, 2 to 4 inches high, in addition to a tall, thick heel. Platforms were trendy with rock stars, such as KISS and Elton John. Ankle injuries increased in the '70s because so many people twisted their ankles while wearing the tall platforms.

Lace-Up Boots

Leather lace-up boots were popular with women in the 1970s, especially hippies. They typically had a chunky medium-to-high heel and were also available in the platform style. The laces went all the way up the front of the boot, which was knee-high or shorter.

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