How to Do Cork Knitting

Written by barbara c. rich
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Cork knitting is a form of loom knitting that makes use of a tool called a corker. Corkers are known by many other names; knitting knobby, knitting nancy and spool knitter are the most common names for this tool.

The corker is used for knitting cords and may have as few as two pegs or as many as six, arranged around a central hole in the corker. A corker can be a simple homemade tool, created by putting nails in the top of an empty thread spool. But these days corkers are more commonly purchased items made of plastic or wood.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Corker
  • Yarn
  • Crochet hook or knitting loom hook

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Drop the free end of the yarn down through the centre hole of the corker, leaving a tail of about six inches hanging below. Loop the working yarn that comes out at the top around each peg counterclockwise, making sure that the yarn crosses over itself after looping. Go around the circuit of pegs again, so that there are two loops on each peg.

  2. 2

    Lift the bottom loop up and over the upper loop on each peg in succession, using the hook. Push the lifted loop down.

  3. 3

    Wrap the pegs again and repeat Step 2. Continue doing this until you have as much cord as you wish.

  4. 4

    Cut the working yarn, leaving a tail of at least four inches. Lift the last round of loops from the corker and, using the hook, draw the tail of yarn through each loop and then pull up snugly.

    The cord may now be used for such items as straps or drawstrings, or as a trim or embellishment.

Tips and warnings

  • As the cord comes through the bottom, resist the urge to tug on it or pull it too tightly.
  • The knitted cord may also be used to make a variety of items. By coiling it and sewing it together you can make coasters or hot pads.

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