How to Freeze My Unbaked Scones

Updated April 17, 2017

Whether you're preparing for a traditional tea or just having a few friends over for coffee, scones are the ideal complement to either occasion. Scones, which resemble a mixture between cake and biscuits, are a meticulous combination of flour, sugar, butter, milk and baking powder rolled into a sticky, soft dough. Limitless varieties of scones are available, including those containing fruits, nuts, chocolate and even cheese. Scones can be prepared well before your tea or get-together, by preparing and freezing the unbaked dough. All you have to do is defrost and bake when you are ready to serve them.

Prepare the dough for your specific scone recipe.

Place the dough on a lightly floured, cleaned surface.

Pat the dough down gently until it is about 1-inch thick.

Cut the dough into circles, triangles or any other shape you wish using cookie cutters. Circles and triangles are the most common scone shapes.

Place the cut scone dough onto a large baking tray lined with parchment paper.

Place the tray of scone dough in the freezer, uncovered, for about one hour or until the dough is firm.

Remove the tray from the freezer, place the individual frozen scone dough into zip-top freezer bags, and place in the freezer.


Take the frozen scones out of the freezer when you're ready to bake them, and allow them to thaw while you preheat the oven. Bake according to your recipe's instructions, adding a few minutes onto the baking time if they are only partially thawed out.

Things You'll Need

  • Prepared scone dough
  • Flour, for dusting
  • Cookie cutters
  • Baking tray
  • Parchment paper
  • Zip-top freezer bags
bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article

About the Author

Based in Los Angeles, Zora Hughes has been writing travel, parenting, cooking and relationship articles since 2010. Her work includes writing city profiles for Groupon. She also writes screenplays and won the S. Randolph Playwriting Award in 2004. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in television writing/producing and a Master of Arts Management in entertainment media management, both from Columbia College.