How to Make LEGO Cards

Written by laura paquette
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How to Make LEGO Cards
Adding a three-dimensional aspect to your card will make it really unique. (lego 1 image by Nathalie P from Fotolia.com)

LEGOs are a popular multicoloured building block toy. Whether for a child or a nostalgic adult, a LEGO greeting card is fun and easy to make, either by hand or online. For a simple card, you may only need construction paper, scissors, markers, and tape. For a more professional look you can custom order personalised LEGO greeting cards or create them yourself using images found online. The key is to use the signature bold primary colour group, simple circle and rectangle shapes, and your imagination.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Clear tape
  • Black marker
  • Internet connection (optional)

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Draw a design for your card. Will your card resemble one big block or many? Flat to fit in an envelope or 3-D? You could even consider doing a yellow LEGO version of your recipient, complete with blocky torso and claw-like hands. Whatever you decide, it will be helpful for you to have a visual to refer to before you begin to create a greeting card. If you don't want to draw a design, you can use actual LEGO blocks as a model or find images online!

  2. 2

    Cut out your shape from construction paper. The basic LEGO block shape is a solid rectangle with an even number of raised circles, usually between two and eight. If you are making one large block, fold your construction paper into thirds along the long end. Then cut off one third from the end. This will be your materials for cutting out circles. The folded paper remaining is the base for your card. If you want your card to be flat, use a black marker to create round pegs and shading, and write your message inside.

  3. 3

    Using your extra third from the construction paper, cut out an even number of circles of equal size. If it's helpful, you can trace the bottom of an empty roll of toilet paper. With the scraps left after you've cut your circles, cut a strip of paper for each circle, about 2 inches in length. Fold the paper many times in alternating directions to create a zigzag, which will act as a spring to pop your LEGO pegs up from the block. Tape one side to the middle of the circle, then tape the other side to the front of your card, spacing the circles evenly apart. This will give the illusion of dimension to your block. You can create the same effect with multiple blocks by cutting out several rectangles from different colours of construction paper, taping them together in a tower or at opposing angles, and writing your message on the back.

    How to Make LEGO Cards
    Think of the folds of a fan when making your paper springs. (fan image by windzepher from Fotolia.com)
  4. 4

    If you aren't interested in crafting the LEGO card yourself, the Hallmark website (see References) will allow you to create your own greeting card for varying occasions and ages. Simply select the kind of card you want to make (Christmas, Birthday, Humorous), pick your style from the options given, and use the editor to make the card your own. You can click on the text to change it, either to one of Hallmark's suggested verses or writing of your own. From that screen, you can preview and continue to checkout.

  5. 5

    If you don't want to pay for the card, but want to get a more polished look, consider printing images from your computer. For example, many websites have galleries of LEGO versions of famous buildings, characters, or scenes from movies. Alternatively, you can use the image of the iconic yellow LEGO face, and with markers or picture editing tools on the computer, add hair, expressions, glasses, freckles, or other identifying characteristics to make it look more like your recipient. Be creative!

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