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How to Adjust the Headlights on a Mazda6

Updated February 21, 2017

The Mazda 6 is a mid-sized, reasonably priced car manufactured since 2002. Like most modern vehicles, the Mazda 6 comes with a wide array of safety features. Everyone is familiar with safety features such as seat belts, air bags and crumple zones, but many overlook one of the most important safety features on a car: the headlights. If the lights are not properly aligned, you could experience poor night driving conditions, or others may not see you coming or may even be blinded by lights that shine too high. Luckily, Mazda's headlights can be easily adjusted by the average do-it-yourselfer.

Park the Mazda 6 one foot away from a large wall or garage door. You will need 25-feet of room to back up; the ground should be level in order to allow for accurate alignment of the beam.

Mark the wall with the painter's tape along the axis points of the headlights. First place a strip of tape horizontally across the wall, starting at the centre of the driver's side lens, then moving across to the centre of the passenger's side. Place a small vertical strip directly in front of each light--this will create two cross-shaped bull's eyes for aiming purposes.

Back the Mazda 6 up 25 feet and turn on the headlights. Determine what needs adjusting by seeing where each beam hits the wall. Both headlights should hit two inches below the horizontal strip of tape. The passenger's side should also hit directly on the vertical strip (in front of it). The driver's side should fall two inches to the right, to avoid blinding oncoming traffic.

Open the bonnet and locate the adjustment screws: These can be found on the top-centre and side-centre of the headlight assembly. These two screws control the vertical and horizontal directions of the beams. Use a standard screwdriver to adjust each one until the light hits the desired mark on the wall. Close the bonnet.

Tip

Load the Mazda with a normal driving weight before taking measurements. Keep in mind the boot, as well as the driver's seat, and have someone sit there while you work.

Things You'll Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Painter's tape
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About the Author

Steve Bradley is an educator and writer with more than 12 years of experience in both fields. He maintains a career as an English teacher, also owning and operating a resume-writing business. Bradley has experience in retail, fashion, marketing, management and fitness. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and classics.