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Easy Way to Transfer Stored Cell Phone Numbers to New Phone

Updated February 21, 2017

The seduction of a new phone with its latest technology can be irresistible and cell phone users can churn through phones frequently. Many cell phone users will replace a phone every 18 months. One of the most annoying tasks when getting a new phone is configuring the new device to replicate the settings and content of the old one. However, there is an easier way than entering the data by hand, if your phone has a SIM card and works on GSM networks (T-Mobile, AT&T in the US and almost everyone in the rest of the world). Copy the address book from the old phone to the existing SIM card and then from the existing SIM card to the new phone.

Open the "SIM Manager" on the old phone. It will be a menu item under Settings.

Look for a menu item marked "Content to SIM" or "Copy Content to SIM" or something similar. Selecting the menu item will bring up either a list of the phone numbers on the phone, or a sub-menu that will be marked "Phone Number." In either case, drill down until you see the list. Select all the numbers. They will probably be highlighted by default. Click "Save"

Remove the SIM card from the old phone and insert it into the new phone. Again, look for the SIM Manager and this time choose a menu item like "Save to Phone" or "Save to Contacts." Follow the same procedure from the previous step and copy the numbers over.

Leave the old SIM card in the new phone if you will be using the old number and existing network carrier. Remove the SIM card and keep it in the old phone as a stored cell phone numbers backup if you have a new number or a new network carrier.

Insert the new SIM card if your network carrier has given you one. The numbers will be stored on the new phone.

Things You'll Need

  • Existing SIM card
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About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.