How to repair a taillight lens

Written by dale yalanovsky
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How to repair a taillight lens
Repair, instead of replacing, a broken tail light. (tail light image by Albert Lozano from

You can repair a broken, cracked or even punctured tail light lens in several different ways. Although you can purchase and install a new tail light on modern cars, a repair may be a better idea in certain situations. If you have a classic car with limited availability of parts, however, a repair might be your only viable option. Moreover, a quick and easy repair works best for damage inflicted on the road. In any case, with a little do-it-yourself experience, you can repair any tail light lens and avoid replacing it.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Red lens-repair tape
  • Plastic tail light repair kit
  • Screwdriver
  • Cellophane tape
  • Plastic epoxy
  • 200-grit sandpaper
  • Red permanent marker

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  1. 1

    Cover a broken tail light with red lens repair tape. Use this tape, which you can find at any auto parts store and most department stores, to tape over any broken or cracked tail light. The translucent red tape will allow the brake and running lights to shine through, just like a regular tail light.

  2. 2

    Repair cracks and holes with a plastic lens repair kit. These kits, which come with instructions and all the items you need to repair any damaged tail light, have become favourites for those who own classic cars with tail light lenses that are almost impossible to find. Look for repair kits at most auto parts stores or online.

  3. 3

    Repair a tail light yourself with simple ingredients and tools. Unscrew the broken lens from the car and place a piece of cellophane tape over the backside of the hole, gouge or crack. Pour some clear five-minute plastic epoxy resin over the damage, and let it dry completely. Sand the repair smooth, with 200-grit sandpaper, then colour the clear epoxy with a red permanent marker. Remount the lens, and you've made a permanent repair.

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