How do I Make Water Splash in Photoshop?

Written by carol adams
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How do I Make Water Splash in Photoshop?
Create splashes using Photoshop. (splash image by cherie from Fotolia.com)

Adobe Photoshop has a number of uses, from retouching photos from magazines to creating simple animation for web pages. You can also use it to add graphic elements and effects to an image. Given enough time and effort, an artist can produce almost photo realistic results. And, if you want, you can use Photoshop to add water splashes to an image. This effect is often employed in beverage ads to produce the feeling of refreshment. All you need for this is Photoshop and a set of water splash brushes, which you can download (see Resources).

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open Photoshop. Select "File" from the menu and choose "Open." In the dialogue that appears, browse to an image that you would like to add splashes to and open it.

  2. 2

    Select the "Brush" tool from the toolbar. In the options at the top, click on the drop-down menu and choose one of the water brushes you loaded.

  3. 3

    Click on the "New Layer" button at the bottom of the "Layers" palette. Now use the brush to begin painting in the water. Change from one brush to another as you work. You should also adjust the size and opacity of the brush to create variation.

  4. 4

    Make the splashes you draw conform to the shape of the object. For example, if the splashes are hitting and object like a can, make some of the splashes bounce off the can. Smaller denser splashes should run in rivulets down the sides.

  5. 5

    Select the "Eraser" from the toolbar and change the opacity to about 40 per cent. Use it to erase sections of the water to make it seem to have depth.

Tips and warnings

  • Remember to save your work.

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