How to remove shoe goo

Written by cheryl torrie
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How to remove shoe goo
Removing white Shoe Goo from black canvas is possible. (Old Sneakers image by Studio Pookini from Fotolia.com)

Shoe Goo is a versatile and effective adhesive that is typically used to rebuild worn-out soles, seal rubber shoes and boots, repair damaged heels and glue down loose insoles. When you get Shoe Goo where you don't want it, it can be complicated to remove. Shoe Goo has been formulated to remain flexible after being completely cured (24 hours after application) but it is possible to remove no matter when you notice it.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Clean dry cloth
  • Acetone
  • Paper towel
  • Paint scraper
  • Razer blade

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Instructions

    Uncured Shoe Goo

  1. 1

    Dampen a clean dry cloth with a small amount of acetone.

  2. 2

    Rub the acetone dampened cloth over the Shoe Goo. Wait five minutes while the acetone is absorbed by the adhesive.

  3. 3

    Rub the shoe glue off with a paper towel. The Shoe Goo will ball up and brush off, onto the paper towel.

    Cured Shoe Goo

  1. 1

    Insert the edge of a paint scraper between the spilt Shoe Goo and the surface you want to remove it from.

  2. 2

    Gently exert pressure on the paint scrapper until the adhesive is separated from the surface, then lift up on the scrapper.

  3. 3

    Insert the edge of a fine razor blade between any remaining Shoe Goo and the surface and gently lift away any of it remaining on the surface.

Tips and warnings

  • Shoe Goo can be painted after 24 hours.
  • Test the colour fastness of your fabric or furniture in an out of the way spot before applying the acetone.
  • Shoe Goo may damage finished surfaces. If the surface is damaged you will have to sand the area and refinish it appropriately.

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