How to Remove a Key From a Sony Vaio Keyboard

Updated February 21, 2017

The keys on your Sony Vaio's keyboard endure a lot of work. From being constantly pressed to having dirt and grime building up on the keys, the keys eventually need cleaning and replacement. Below each key is a rubber suction cup that not only cushions the key, but also helps in making contact with the electric circuit board underneath the keyboard. To clean underneath a key or to replace a key on your Sony Vaio keyboard, you have to remove the individual keys carefully to keep from damaging the keyboard

Place the keyboard on a flat surface--a desk, countertop or workbench.

Place the end of a small screwdriver or jeweller's screwdriver underneath one side of the key you want to remove from the keyboard.

Place your finger on top of the key.

Pry the side of the key up gently. You will see the side of the key coming up.

Place the end of the small screwdriver or jeweller's screwdriver underneath the other side of the key.

Keep your finger on the key and pry the other side of key up gently. The key will pop up from the rubber suction cup and post.

Place the key on a soft rag or cloth for cleaning.

Press the cleaned key firmly on to the post and rubber suction cup to reinstall the key on your keyboard.


The space bar has a metal bar that runs the length of the key. To remove the space bar, once you have the key off the post and rubber suction cup, use your fingers to pop the space bar off the metal bar. To reinstall the space bar, press the metal bar back on the key, then press the key back on to the post and rubber suction cup.

Things You'll Need

  • Small screwdriver or jeweller's screwdriver
  • Soft rag or cloth
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About the Author

Nick Davis is a freelance writer specializing in technical, travel and entertainment articles. He holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Memphis and an associate degree in computer information systems from the State Technical Institute at Memphis. His work has appeared in "Elite Memphis" and "The Daily Helmsman" in Memphis, Tenn. He is currently living in Albuquerque, N.M.