Ping Eye 3 Specs

Written by izzy barden
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

In 1999, Ping introduced a line of i3 irons in both oversized and blade forms. Each was built to suit a specific skill set, oversized for novice golfers and blades for more experienced ones. They were both designed with durable cast iron heads and later models included the i3+ and i3+ Blades. As of late 2010, neither were still in production and could no longer be purchased new.

Other People Are Reading

i3 Oversized

The Ping i3 Oversized irons were fitted with a deep and forgiving cavity back and a larger-than-average club face. These features reduced spin and enlarged the sweet spot, raising the moment of inertia and allowing for consistency and maximum forgiveness. However, the assistance given by their design came at the expense of distance and workability, making them a saviour to beginners but an unnecessary frustration to advanced golfers.

i3 Blades

The Ping i3 Blades were constructed with a reduced cavity back and smaller sweet spot than their oversized counterparts. These features, coupled with only a slight offset, minimised forgiveness but increased spin and velocity at the point of impact, maximising distance and workability. They were designed to cater to experienced golfers and could be extremely difficult for novice players to use appropriately.

Counterfeit Clubs

Generally, the best way to avoid purchasing counterfeit clubs is to purchase directly from manufacturers or authorised vendors. However, Ping no longer distributes i3 irons, and Internet auction websites are often breeding grounds for cloned clubs. Always examine potential merchandise and take note of any discrepancies in the logo or insignia--this can weed out poorly made clones. Whenever possible, try to compare potential purchases with known-to-be-authentic merchandise, either online or at a golf course or outlet store.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.