A list of gluten & wheat free foods

Written by diane braun
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Living gluten- and wheat-free can seem intimidating at first. However, there are many foods that you already eat that don't contain gluten or wheat, and there are lots of foods you can add to your diet to replace the gluten items you're no longer eating.

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Be Aware

Read all labels. Manufacturers add modified food starch (which often comes from wheat) to an extraordinary and unexpected number of prepared foods. Most canned soups contain it and many sauces, creams and dressings include it, as well. Watch out for malt because it's made from barley, which contains gluten.

Gluten- and Wheat-Free Dining

You can bake almost any "gluten food", such as cakes, breads and cookies, by substituting gluten-free flours for gluten flour (wheat, rye or barley). Combine several of the gluten-free flours for best results.

Grains, Nuts, and Flours:

The wide variety of gluten-free flours available include amaranth, arrowroot, buckwheat, cassava, coconut, corn, flax, Indian rice grass, kasha, legumes, millet, nuts, potatoes, quinoa, rice (brown, white, and wild), sorghum, soy, tapioca, teff and yucca.

Also Gluten-Free

Beans, sugar, honey, real maple syrup, eggs, raisins, fruit, vegetables, berries, seeds, herbs, spices, salt, baking soda, vanilla, chocolate, coffee, tea, fruit juice, milk, cheese, yoghurt, sour cream and butter are safe gluten-free foods.

Usually Gluten-Free

Sea food, baking powder, yeast, soft drinks, peanut butter, jams, jellies, and frosting are usually fine to eat, just make sure to check the labels. Most meat is also fine, but some hot dogs, sausages, and other processed meats do contain gluten.

Medicines and Vitamins

Talk to the manufacturers of any medications you take to ensure they're gluten free. Many common vitamins do contain gluten as fillers.

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