Information on the Yamaha PSR-E303 Keyboard

Written by matthew anderson
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Information on the Yamaha PSR-E303 Keyboard
The Yamaha PSR-E303 is an entry level keyboard. (keyboard image by Vasiliy Koval from Fotolia.com)

The Yamaha PSR-E303 is a discontinued, entry-level keyboard. This keyboard, which was produced between 2005 to 2007, had a manufacturer's suggested retail price of £168.90. The PSR-E313 and PSR-E323 were the successor models to the PSR-E303, which was primarily designed for beginners, but had some advanced features.

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Basic Features

The Yamaha PSR-E303 is designed with all its features built-in, which is similar to most beginner keyboards. This includes having all of the controls and speakers built directly into the keyboard itself. The PSR-E303 also has a built-in education system. When activated, the system will play a song for the user before prompting the user to play the song themselves. The display screen shows the correct notes and timing for the user.

Velocity Sensors

The PSR-E303 has 61 keys with velocity sensors, which is called “Expressive Touch” by Yamaha. The velocity used to press the key indicates the amount of pressure. On a normal piano, pressing a key harder causes the hammer to hit the string harder. This results in a louder note. "Expressive Touch" Yamaha keyboards simulate this effect.

Voice Support

This keyboard has 482 different voices that can be selected. A keyboard voice refers to each different type of sound the keyboard can be set to play. Setting the PSR-E303 to the trumpet voice, for example, will cause each key to sound like a trumpet. The Yamaha PSR-E303 keyboard supports MIDI and XGlite voices. MIDI is the standard used by virtually all keyboards. XGlite is a group of voices exclusive to Yamaha keyboards.

Voice Modes

The Yamaha PSR-E303 supports dual and split voice modes. Dual mode causes the keyboard to play two different voices simultaneously when a key is pressed. For example, the keyboard can be set up to sound like a celesta and harpsichord are playing the same note simultaneously. Setting up a split voice allows the player to set the right and left half of the keyboard to different voices. This is useful for instruments that are not played in certain ranges--for example, setting the bass notes to sound like a bass and treble notes to sound like a violin.

Extra Features

The PSR-E303 has a few features not typically seen on entry-level keyboards. The pitch bend wheel allows the player to change the pitch by a microtone. This allows users to hit pitches between the notes on the keyboard. The keyboard also has real-time filter controls. On some keyboards, any effects must be set up completely in advance. This keyboard allows those effects to be adjusted with the control knobs while playing.

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