Activities for blind people

Written by dan clark
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Although it's tempting to start by asking what activities blind people can do, it might be more helpful to ask first what blind people can't do. There are a few activities that it may be illegal for a blind person to do, such as drive a car, and other activities that may be impossible, such as looking at photos, but most activities are possible for the blind or can be made accessible through simple adaptations.

Other Senses

There are many activities to pursue that focus on senses other than sight. Music, for example, can be both appreciated and created. News programs and radio plays can also be listened to, and movies and television also have audio elements that can be enjoyed apart from the visuals. Tactile arts and crafts, such as sculpture and knitting, can also be done without the use of the eyes, and many games, such as 20 Questions, can be played entirely with speaking and listening. Although different skills are required for those who are blind to cook, cooking emphasises texture, smell and taste. Gardening is also rich with sensations. The blind can do activities that focus on the movement of their bodies too, such exercising, walking and hiking, swimming or martial arts. Practice imagining physical space can give blind people an advantage in crafting intricate models or building mechanical and electrical devices.

Adaptation

Many other activities can be adapted so that they are accessible to the blind. The blind can access books through the reading of someone else, audio tapes or by scanning books into a computer and having them read by text-to-speech software. This software, along with speech-to-text software and Braille displays, can also make it possible for blind people to use computers and the Internet to reach a wealth of information, play games and communicate with others. Cards and board games can be adapted for the blind, through a combination of Braille and an increased role of memory.

Blind Community

Many areas have centres and groups for blind people. These places offer additional resources, and they may also be have regularly scheduled events and outings for members of the blind community.

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