List of Carbohydrates in Fresh Vegetables

Written by scott christ
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List of Carbohydrates in Fresh Vegetables
(vegetable market image by Bionic Media from Fotolia.com)

In general, fresh vegetables are low in carbohydrates and high in nutrients. Carbohydrates provide energy for cells in the body, but eating too many of them can raise blood sugar and insulin levels and cause weight gain, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, some vegetables have a moderately high carbohydrate content, while others do not contain any.

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On the High End

Certain types of fresh vegetables, such as corn, contain higher amounts of carbohydrates than other types. For instance, 1/2 cup of corn contains 16g of carbohydrates per serving. Squash is another vegetable with a higher carbohydrate content, with 15g per 1/2 cup serving of acorn squash and 11g per 1/2 cup serving of butternut squash. Parsnips have 12g of carbs per 1/2 cup serving. Potatoes are among the vegetables with the highest carbohydrate content, with 18g per medium-sized potato and 28g per medium-sized sweet potato. Artichokes, leeks and Brussels sprouts have 13, 12 and 10g of carbohydrates, respectively.

In the Middle

Onions and peas both contain around 9g of carbohydrates per 1/2 cup serving, while zucchini has 6g and okra and collard greens 7g per serving. Carrots and shallots each have 8g per serving.

On the Low End

Most vegetables have fewer than 5g of carbs per 1/2 cup serving. For example, six asparagus spears have just 4g of carbohydrates per serving, while one small tomato has 4g and green and red peppers both contain 5g. Bok choy, cabbage, celery, cucumber and romaine lettuce each have 2g per serving. The the list of fresh vegetables with zero or 1g of carbohydrates include alfalfa sprouts, mushrooms, watercress, radishes, radicchio, and jalapeño and chilli peppers.

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