Negative aspects of teamwork

Written by jillian o'keeffe Google
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Negative aspects of teamwork
One of these people is gritting their teeth. (Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images)

Some people like working in teams, and other people hate having to interact with others to get a work task done. The aim of teamwork, though, is to expedite work in the best approach possible. Proponents of the teamwork system say that teams help the sharing of information between colleagues, aid in interpersonal relationships, and foster cooperation.

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Personalities

Some people cannot help but try and take over a group, and when this happens, others can resent it and mentally opt out of the teamwork thought process. Other people are at the opposite end of the scale, and are quiet in group situations, so teamwork can stifle their opinions on their work, which otherwise they'd just quietly get on with in their own way.

Freeloaders

A common complaint in a teamwork situation is that some people don't pull their weight. If the work was divided into individual responsibilties, there would be nowhere to hide for these lazy people, but teamwork can mask this. Conversely, some hardworking people may not have their contributions recognised if the work is judged as a group.

Squashing creativity

A team generally has to come to a consensus, and sometimes this can stifle creativity. The technical term for this is groupthink, where the group focuses so much on being a team that they forget to take into account viewpoints that are creatively different to the majority. This can lead to mediocre decision-making, and might make the person offering a creative opinion resentful of the group.

Time

Scheduling a variety of people together is time-consuming in itself, as it requires juggling people's time commitments. Meeting up for a teamwork session also requires the members to drop individual tasks and physically get to the meeting room. Once there, sometimes teamwork principles means that a consensus has to be reached, and if there is dissension within the group, this can take up the time of all the members.

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