DISCOVER
×

How to Put a New Crystal on a Rolex

Rolex watches are high-end timepieces for men and women. Although the company originally fitted its watches with plastic covers, it switched to sapphire crystal when that technology came of age. Sapphire crystal is more durable and easy to clean. Hairline scratches can be polished out of sapphire crystal, which is more scratch-resistant than its plastic predecessor. You can replace your own Rolex crystal but if your watch is still under warranty, it is recommended that you get an authorised jeweller to change your crystal if you do not wish to void your warranty.

Lay out the soft cloth on a clean working surface. Ensure that your work space is free of dust and lint which may adversely affect the watch mechanism. The cloth will prevent your watch from sustaining scratches during the repairs.

Slide the razor blade between the back of the watch and the bezel. The bezel is the metal ring that secures the crystal to the watch body.

Slide the blade around the edge of the bezel. Pry up the bezel as you go around the watch. Use the razor blade to pry the bezel and crystal from the watch face.

Push on the crystal from the outside in to separate it from the bezel.

Clean the replacement crystal and push it into the bezel. Place the watch face up in a bezel press. Push down on the handle to secure the crystal and bezel to the watch body.

Tip

If your crystal is scratched, try to remove the scratch by polishing or buffing before opting to replace the crystal.

Warning

Opening your Rolex watch will compromise your warranty. Handle the watch with great care once the crystal is removed to prevent damage to the mechanism.

Things You'll Need

  • Double-sided, flat razor blade
  • Replacement crystal
  • Soft cloth
  • Bezel press
Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

Resources

About the Author

Nicole Fotheringham has been a writer since 1997. She was born in South Africa and began as a reporter for the "Natal Mercury" and "Cape Argus" newspapers. Fotheringham has a master's degree in English literature from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.