How to Record in Stereo on Ableton Live

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How to Record in Stereo on Ableton Live
The guitar is mono by default, but Ableton Live can send that signal to both channels. (Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images)

Ableton Live is an extremely useful program for recording and editing music. It has a number of options and effects that make it very versatile. If you wish to record music in Ableton, your instrument's signal will be produced as either mono or stereo. A mono signal travels on only one channel. A stereo signal travels on two. Even if your instrument signal is mono in nature, Ableton can send that signal to two channels for a stereo effect.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Ableton Live
  • Instrument
  • Instrument cable
  • Audio interface

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Connect your instrument cable to your audio interface. This is likely a 1/4-inch plug, and most audio interfaces have a 1/4-inch jack.

  2. 2

    Connect your audio interface to your computer. Most audio interfaces connect to your computer's USB port using a USB cable. Make sure your audio interface is recognised by your computer. You may need to download and install drivers from the manufacturer's website.

  3. 3

    Open a new project in Ableton Live.

  4. 4

    Open Preferences from the Options drop-down menu.

  5. 5

    Select the "Audio" tab.

  6. 6

    Select "Input Config." Make sure that your input is received as a stereo signal. If your incoming signal is mono in nature, you can send that signal to both channels for a stereo effect.

  7. 7

    Select "Output Config." Make sure that your output is being sent as a stereo signal. The "1/2 stereo" button should be illuminated.

  8. 8

    Click the "Record" button and play your instrument.

Tips and warnings

  • If you have a mono signal, you can give it more stereo depth by panning it in interesting ways. Use either the track's panning function or the Auto Pan effect.

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