DISCOVER
×

How to adjust idle mixture screws on a 2-cycle outboard motor

Updated February 21, 2017

Routinely adjusting the idle mixture screws on a 2-cycle outboard motor will keep the engine running efficiently and provide power when you need. The 2-cycle outboard motor has two idle adjustment screws on the top of the carburettor that can be adjusted with just a screwdriver and a vacuum gauge. You can fine-tune the idle mixture screws in a few minutes and keep the motor running strong.

Turn the idle adjustment screws clockwise with a screwdriver until you feel a slight resistance without over-tightening the screws. Turn both screws back counterclockwise 1-1/4 turns to set the starting position for the adjustment on the 2-cycle outboard motor.

Start the motor and let it warm up for about five minutes. Remove the rubber vacuum hose from the vacuum port and attach a vacuum gauge to the port.

Adjust the idle stop screw on the side of the carburettor near the choke cable, turning the screw with a screwdriver until the vacuum gauge is reading about 600rpm.

Turn the idle mixture screw counterclockwise 1/4-turn at a time until you hear the engine begin to stall out, and turn it clockwise 1/4-turn.

Adjust the idle mixture screw by turning it clockwise 1/4-turn at a time until it starts to stall again and turn it back counterclockwise 1/4-turn.

Repeat Steps Four and Five for the idle air speed screw. Check the idle stop screw next to the choke and verify it is still running about 600rpm.

Remove the vacuum gauge from the vacuum port, reattach the vacuum hose and shut off the 2-cycle outboard motor.

Warning

To avoid burns, be mindful of the hot engine parts while adjusting the outboard carburettor.

Things You'll Need

  • Screwdriver
  • Vacuum gauge
bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article

About the Author

Carl Pruit has been a freelance writer since 2005, specializing in service journalism and travel. His work has appeared on various websites. Born and raised in California, Pruit attended Contra Costa Community College in San Pablo, Calif. and received an associate degree in the administration of justice.