How to Make a Textbox in XNA

Written by sean mann
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Making a Textbox in XNA is useful when you want to display text to the user in your game. XNA is a development environment created by Microsoft for coding computer games. The text in a Textbox appears left to right, similar to how characters appears in a text editor when you type. To create a Textbox, you need a textured image file that you can use as a background for the Textbox.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Open the XNA Framework and load your Windows Game project.

  2. 2

    Open the "Game1.cs" file.

  3. 3

    Declare "Rectangle" and "Texture2D" objects at the top of the "Game1.cs" file, right after the "GraphicsDeviceManager graphics; SpriteBatch sprite Batch;" lines. For example, "Rectangle my_textbox; Texture2D myColor;".

  4. 4

    Set your textbox's initial width, height and position in the "Initialize()" method. For example, "my_textbox = new Rectangle(20, 20, 100, 100);" makes a textbox with a size of 100 by 100 and positioned at the coordinates (20,20).

  5. 5

    Load a textured image to your project by switching over to Visual C#, opening the Solution Explorer, right-clicking "Content" and clicking "Add -> Existing Item". Select your image file.

  6. 6

    Load the texture background for the textbox using the "Content.Load" function in the "LoadContent()" method. For example, "myColor = Content.Load<Texture2D>("color_description");".

  7. 7

    Draw the textbox by using the sprite Batch object's "Begin", "Draw" and "End" functions in the "Draw()" method, before "base.Draw(gameTime);" and after "TODO". For example, "spriteBatch.Begin(); spriteBatch.Draw(myColor, my_textbox, Color.Black); spriteBatch.End();". Your textbox should now automatically display once you run your program.

  8. 8

    Save your Windows Game Project.

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