How to seal the floor in a walk-in shower

Updated February 21, 2017

Adding a new shower can bring a rejuvenated feeling to your bathroom. But it is a major undertaking. During a bathroom renovation or remodel, many different projects are taken on and completed, including replacing the shower. Once a walk-in shower has been installed, there are finishes which need to be addressed. Among the most important is sealing the shower floor to keep water from seeping into the subfloor.

Scrape up any loose caulking from the shower floor with a plastic putty knife. Do not use a metal putty knife as it may scratch the tile itself. Place the scraped-up caulk in a trash bag and dispose of it.

Rinse the shower floor down with warm water. Sprinkle or squirt dish detergent directly on the tiles and let sit for a few minutes while occasionally misting over the detergent.

Clean the shower floor thoroughly with a scrub brush, getting up any mould, mildew and soap residue. Rinse the floor until all the dish detergent has washed away.

Apply haze remover to the shower floor with cloths, concentrating on the grout. Repeat cleaning with the haze remover until no haze is present on the floor or grout lines. Rinse the floor again.

Allow the shower floor to air dry completely by opening the bathroom windows and placing a portable fan in front of the shower.

Spray on a coat of grout sealer to the grout lines in the shower floor, wiping away excess with a rag as necessary.

Seal the borders of the shower floor with silicone sealant using a caulk gun to lay a thick bead along all four edges. Wipe excess up with a rag as you go along. Let the silicone sealer dry for at least 24 hours before using the shower. Consult the manufacturer's label for specific drying/curing times.


Use sealers in a well-ventilated area.

Things You'll Need

  • Plastic putty knife
  • Trash bag
  • Grout haze remover
  • Cloths
  • Dish detergent
  • Scrub brush
  • Portable fan
  • Grout sealer spray
  • Rags
  • Silicone sealant
  • Caulk gun
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About the Author

Owen Richason grew up working in his family's small contracting business. He later became an outplacement consultant, then a retail business consultant. Richason is a former personal finance and business writer for "Tampa Bay Business and Financier." He now writes for various publications, websites and blogs.