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How to Remove Jacuzzi Bath Tub Jets

Updated February 21, 2017

A jacuzzi-brand hot tub (or "bath tub") inside a home propels water into the tub from a spigot commonly called a jet. If the jet is defective, the water will not come out under pressure and the experience that's a hot tub will be ruined. You can remove a defective jet and replace it with a new one yourself. Procure the jet from a pool and spa supply store.

Trip the circuit breaker on the fuse box to disconnect the electric line from the jacuzzi-brand tub. Turn the jacuzzi's power switch to the "Off" position, if it's not already on this setting.

Open the access panel on the bottom side of the jacuzzi. If screws are holding the access panel in place, remove them using a Phillips screwdriver first.

Rotate any valves inside the compartment fully clockwise. Open the drain to empty the water out of the tub.

Wipe the grill covering the defective jet with a dry cloth once all of the water is gone. Remove the screws holding the grill to the inside of the jacuzzi with a Phillips screwdriver. If star screws are used instead of Phillips screws, use a star screwdriver to remove the screws instead.

Pull the grill off and place it aside. Remove the rubber gasket from the compartment. The gasket surrounds the jet and provides a seal against water leakage.

Place the jaws of a pliers or wrench, depending on your preference, around the jet that's inside the compartment. Rotate the pliers or wrench counterclockwise until the jet comes loose.

Unscrew the jet from the pipe fitting it's on. Remove the jet and dispose of it. You can now attach a replacement jet to the pipe, return the inside and outside of the jacuzzi to normal, refill the water, and restore the power.

Things You'll Need

  • Phillips screwdriver/star screwdriver
  • Pliers/wrench
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About the Author

Marshal M. Rosenthal is a technology maven with more than 15 years of editorial experience. A graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography with a Bachelor of Arts in photographic arts, his editorial work has appeared both domestically as well as internationally in publications such as "Home Theater," "Electronic House," "eGear," "Computer and Video Games" and "Digitrends."