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How to sharpen my ped egg blades

Updated July 19, 2017

A Ped Egg is a portable "pedicure in your palm" used to remove dry, rough skin from the sole, sides, toe and heel of your foot. The Ped Egg is especially designed to remove only the top layer of skin -- the short micro files on its surface prevent it from going deep enough into your skin to cause damage and bleeding. Often referred to as a foot grater, the Ped Egg is similar to a cheese grater and therefore difficult to sharpen.

Replace the blades cartridge instead of trying to sharpen the blades at home. One cartridge comes with each newly purchased Ped Egg, and should your blades become dull, you can purchase a set of three replacement cartridges. Simply detach the dull cartridge from the plastic carrier and fit a replacement one in its place.

Use a steel, a rod-like piece of steel used for sharpening knives. Just like sharpening a knife, gently run your Ped Egg across a steel to sharpen it.

Run the Ped Egg across a sharpening stone with the blades facing down. Be sure to do this gently to avoid damaging the blades.

Use a piece of steel wool to lightly buff the blades. This process may take longer than the other two but should still be as effective.

Tip

When purchased, the Ped Egg does not come with instructions for sharpening the blades. The lack of instructions might be a good indication that sharpening the blades could result in damage to them or to you. Given the low price of the Ped Egg and replacement blade cartridges, it is safer to just buy new blades than to try to sharpen the them.

Warning

When you sharpen your Ped Egg blades, avoid applying too much force. Applying too much force could cause your hand to slip and result in cuts and abrasions. Always turn the blades downward and away from you to sharpen them.

Things You'll Need

  • A steel (knife-sharpening tool)
  • Sharpening stone
  • Steel wool
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About the Author

Anyonita Green started writing in 1995 and has been published in "Coraddi," "Timeless Voices," "Unsung Magazine," "Shoestring" and online at Prerequisite, Rainy City Stories, Yelp, Leisure Daily and Poems and Plates. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.